LWF11 – Day 2

Standard

Continuing on from the Sunday Service I was ready for some more exciting and innovative thinking at Learning Without Frontiers – Day 2. The day kicked off with a Welcome & Introduction by Graham Brown-Martin, where he introduced a variety of speakers. There was an interesting talk from Iris Lapinski, who runs Apps for Good, a programme where young people learn to create apps. The talk was mainly focusing around themes of problem solving and making people’s lives easier. Iris called upon a student to come and talk about an Oyster Card App where users can check the amount of money left on their card. The app also gave people the option of depositing more money if they were low. The app was made because they identified a problem many people were experiencing, to back this up many people in the room agreed that they too had come across this problem and had caused them to me late for work/meetings/appointments.

Continue reading

LWF11 – Continuing with Sunday Service

Standard

After Jason Bradbury’s Dot Robot Show, there was a mix of sessions including EduPunk, Pecha Kucha, Industry Talks and ‘Teachers with Tech’ sessions where International teachers displayed their best practice in Game Based Learning and Handheld Learning. This gave me the opportunity to see various speakers displaying some good practice mostly in the classroom.

Firstly I saw a very interesting talk from Mark Sutton from Soar Valley College in Leicester. Mark was taking a personalised learning approach with PSPs in the classroom. Using the camera attachment and Second Sight (a program used with the camera), pupils would explore a physical area with their PSPs to simply find files for the topic they were learning. Student feedback was positive as they commented on the fact it was better than a laptop due to the speed of discovery. Mark then went on to using the PSP with Augmented Reality, where the pupils were learning about the Solar System. Again by using the Second Sight software, pupils would move around an environment and discover semi-codes (symbols much like QR codes). By placing the camera over a symbol, a planet would then appear where they could discover facts and see the planets spinning over the top of the camera image. One very interesting point was discovered when finding an autistic pupil who rarely interacted with other pupils really opened up and got involved in discussion when introducing the technology.

Continue reading