Children with Special Needs Evaluation

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Yesterday Caroline Leeson,  Mark Pannell, Flea Palmer and myself showcased ‘Children with Special Needs’ to a group of 25 students in the Faculty of Education. We gave a quick introduction and that we would welcome any feedback on the project. We didn’t tell them too much on how to use it as we wanted to see how easy it was to use with no prior knowledge. The session lasted about 45 minutes and we collected a range of written feedback about how much they learned, usability features and criticisms in general. The group were very happy to participate and we were very thankful for their efforts in using the project for the first time. The majority of the feedback is positive with some questions raised about individual confusing points which we will clear up in the introduction of the site. We have all worked very had on this project and it was very satisfying to see it being used and used successfully. Below is a final screenshot of project in its new skin, and it can also be viewed here.

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Interactive Learning Scenarios in Child Protection

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At the University of Plymouth I am involved in the creation and development of ‘Interactive Learning Scenarios in Child Protection’ which is a project headed by Caroline Leeson, a lecturer in Early Childhood Studies in Faculty of Education. The brief was to create an interactive story with immediate feedback to teach student teachers how to deal with children who have special needs. The child in this story, Elliott, is 3 years old and has serious difficulties with attention deficit syndrome. He has problems sitting still, concentrating and sharing.

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Mix Me Up!

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‘Mix Me Up!’ is a visual display of beliefs and expressions dealing with multicultural issues in today’s society. Considering diverse religions, communities, ideologies, and conventions related to ethnic origins including how society accepts and treats individuals.

Multiculturalism is an ideology advocating that society should consist of, or at least allow and include, distinct cultural groups, with equal status. Multiculturalism has its supporters and critics alike. Its supporters often see it as a self-evident entitlement of cultural groups, as a form of civil rights grounded in equality of cultures.

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